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missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne ridgway was assistant secretary of state for europe and candidate from 1985-89. in her 32 year fo
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can access care at a single point and village across the platform as a whole. we were governmental sponsored plan because it does not encourage innovation and does not encourage competitive aspects. we hope you will get better going forward. >> slightly off-topic, [laughter] >> mr. brousard, i want to comment and give you some background first. i am a humana -- prescriber through my wife's retirement. and generally very satisfied with the program, particularly enjoy the silver sneakers relationship to encourage exercise.
jointly accepted the prize. the prize committee said the 27-nation bloc turned europe from a continent of war into a continent of peace. rampai vowed to strengthen european unity andverce th economic crisis. however, critics say the prize is inappropriate, pointing out that the eu has failed to limit the impact of europe's economic troubles. those same critics are pointing at italy. what does this say about investors? >> it says that investors are selling bonds. that's why the yields are going up. it also implies these same people are getting cautious, incrsing cautious er the country. he says he will resign once the next budget bill is passed. the rates had been easing for about a month. the key index on the milan stock exchange plunged by nearly 4% ending the day with a 2.2% drop. the euro was traded lower against the dollar and the yen. the future of italian politics is now more cloudy. the announcement doesn't seem to have caused nu ed much trouble investers outside of italy. >>> over in the united states president obama said he is ready to compromise before plunging over the fisca
. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furthermore, azerbaijan and joys the solid relationship with israel. which further distances terrain from one anot
europe. and these guys are good. eventually they will develop an icbm that could reach the united states. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though t
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
side relies on faith, and our side, especially in europe, seems to rely on materialism. this was a struggle of the human soul, chambers wrote, but we often seem to believe that the answer to islamism is simply more employment opportunities for saudi youth. we're, this a sense, in a position that we criticize the chinese leadership for having, but even here on the islamic question, chambers had interesting things to say. he wrote, quote, "the difference between liberalism and communism was in degree only." this question arose in the previous panel. continuing" they put faith in man rather than god and shared a common world view." there is a lesson here. chambers held we could not fight communism, bask with its near relation, liberalism. if 4e were alive, i think he would say we cannot fight extreme sharing a world view with it, namely, non-violent islamist extremism. if that's obvious to you, it's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremis
for the united states to open up a second front in western europe, and the british and roosevelt asked stalin to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the brit
by the lower court. >> he admitted to manipulating more than 20 games across europe. together with a group of accomplices, he plate -- paid cash to players and officials to influence the action on a field. he put big bets on those games by bookmakers in asia. the court today confirmed that it was a clear attempt to cheat them out of money. >> the court today made a clear ruling confirming that the manipulation of sporting betts announced -- amounts to fraud. the bookmakers were in effect deceived. >> but the judges also overturned parts of the original verdict. he had already served time in jail for a previous scandal involving a referee. in his second trial, he helped the police investigation. the judges say that was not reflected in the sentence, but he cannot count on a softer sentence when the case goes back on trial. prosecutors will be trying for a longer jail term. europe's biggest betting scandal is far from over. >> let's stay with soccer. it has been a relatively easy draw for germany's key teams in the second round of the champions league. let's have a look now at the upcoming m
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
time off and traveled a good bit. we were in europe several times. so the guy admits, i have all this money. i didn't need to work. and i was in europe vacationing and i took out unemployment benefits any way. is that an abuse of the system? well, it is. against the guidelines for taking unemployment. the guidelines are that you have to contact five employers a week. did you contact them from paris. submit proof online and be available for work at any time. how were you going to be available when you were on a fancy vacation in europe. he obviously broke the rules. when you ask him why did you take the unemployment benefits when you obviously didn't need it? an amazing answer. here's what he said. after working for 35 years and finding myself unmr. unemployed during a deep recession. going through the unemployment process has given me a sincere appreciation for those who are doing the difficult job of looking for work as well as the dedicated professionals who administer the reemployment assistance program. how did he treat others? according to the "huffington post," scott and hi
collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against franc
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent data out of europe, we will talk about in a minute what a day for the asian markets again. also coming up. our road map begins at andrews air force base where the president arrives in a couple of hours, cutting his hawaiian vacation short to address the fiscal cliff s there really any hope in the last attempt? does the market fade if there's no news tomorrow night? >> the nikkei continues its 21-month run. how much is the boj willing to put up with? >> looking a at potential strike in the nation's port on the east and southern coast, the first since '77 that could cost retailers and importers billions. businesses now asking its white house to get involved. >>> you can now get the nokia lumia for free, depending on the service provider contract you sign s that standard practice or a sign the company's flagship phone suspect selling well? >>> we will start off with news about the fiscal cliff. congress returning to capitol hill today to try to get a deal done on the cliff before the deadline on december 31st. senate majority leader harry rei
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
here or in europe. >> i heard that even if he distances himself he can contribute to contribute as a real leader to our country, because our country is in are really difficult situation. i hope that he can do something positive. >> campaigning for the elections will start officially. in the end, he may be called again to lead the country out of the economic crisis. al jazeera, rome. >> still to come -- security remains tight inside the egyptian presidential palace after the opposition rejects a referendum. and fired tear through a market in the afghan capital, destroying thousands of shops. we will back in just a few minutes. >> hello. the weather is looking pretty good over eastern brazil. the showers have drifted away over the heart of the amazon basin. 1 or two showers over the east. temperatures around 32 degrees. we will see highs around 30 celsius in buenos aires. pretty humid. i would not be surprised if we caught a rumble or two of thunder. you could see some temperatures around 26 celsius in santiago. we're seeing some rather wet weather. showers drifting away across ve
in europe there is a risk of social explosion in greece. >> you can still hear the gunfire being fired over the heads of the protesters, as well as heavy tier grass -- teargas shelling, but the crowd is energetic and young. >> until today, this was an atlantic city, new jersey -- this was the boardwalk in atlantic city, new jersey. hurricane sandy made by a work of it, turning it to rubble -- made light work of it, turning it to rubble. >> in the coming weeks and months, i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties. >> when adults bury a child, it goes against the laws of nature. these children will never grow to be adults. >> the air side rent is going on now. we are going to -- air siren is going on now. we are going to duck. there's usually about 20 seconds, 15 seconds. >> the new chinese chief is revealed. >> i designed it. >> the expedition to an island of ice that broke off. >> previously, both factions had tried hard to avoid such confrontation. the muslim brotherhood and the opposition are urging supporters on to the same streets on the same day. sil
the rest of europe, not against austerity cutbacks. the demonstrators accused the authorities of going on a spending spree which they claim wastes too much of the country's financial resources. instead of doubling their usual christmas or new year's shopping, these people decided to take to the streets and protests against the government and the wrongful spending of their money, the people's money. opposition leaders are asking for early elections from thousands of their followers. but >> this is only the beginning. they use police forces to send us from parliament. now we are on the streets and fighting for democracy in our country on the streets. >> we are here because we are against this regime and we want democracy to return to macedonia. we want to remove this dictator. resistance is our duty. >> we have gathered to say enough of this and the parliament representatives. >> demonstrations finished peacefully, but resolving this and the former yugoslav republic of macedonia is still far away. >>> russia says that its forces have killed seven suspected militants in the troubled cauca
unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this filt meaninginglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by sec cue lar fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to dwive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revotion against the history of religi
hear about the army firing one of our most effective division commanders in europe in our first your of war there, and that's really the they had that began the book for me, going back and studying this. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult rel
it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you grow a real economy without being able to produce goods in a competitive way. i think that it's important to also understand that there are so many factors that go into the adequacy of an educational system. you've referred to consolidation. absolutely critical. and new york state, 650 school districts. a lot of them, each of whom has their -- has one school bus or some of whom have one school bus and a commissioner transportation. >> oklahoma as tiny as we are have 521 school districts. >> that is a very tough nut politically. because education is always local. and always wants to make sure her kid gets on the football team. and it's hard to change that. but there's enormous, enormous redundancy in expenditures there. and that has to be addressed. also, the nature of the population varies. and that has an impact on the quality of education. and the ability of schools to teach. and the same time we have to recognize that 50 years ago, we had -- there weren't very many opportunities for women. there weren't very many women running sta
in missiles, -- winding machine. these things are used in missiles. europe has tightened up. they have been working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation pr
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
reach israel today and that will be able to reach europe in the not-too-distant future and ultimately the united states. second, you would have, i think, a nuclear tarmd iran would ignite a nuclear arms race in the most volatile part of the world, and third, you -- i think a nuclear armed iran would be significantly more aggressive in placing like iraq and afghanistan and throughout the region in terms of trying to throw their weight around. so i think that this is one of those situations where the only acceptable alternative, the only good alternative is that the economic pressures bring enough popular unhappiness in iran because of economic disasters that are going on there, that the regime decides it is in its own best interests and for its own security. >> rose: that assumes rational thinking on their part. >> i think that they are not irrational. and, you know, to say that they are rational actors all the time, i don't accept that either, but when it comes to these kind of things, the one thing they don't want is a war with the united states. and so i think that this -- the only
of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. crossing into the base, i notice that there was a shore patrolman wor
of the biggest unions larry. he said in western europe, they may have higher unemployment but they have less inequality. this is what the agenda is all about. in a practical way, suppose you have a successful person. he or she want to build a house. to do that you might hire 15, 20, 25 people. you got a whole army of people who would go to work. but if you get taxed, you might not guy that house. and you won't build. that is the kind of logic i'm not hearing. dow think they get that? >> they don't. i saw lincoln. remember during the debate in 2008 charlie gibson asked the then president obama why raise capital gains? he said it is about social justice and fairness. it doesn't matter that it doesn't work. what counts to these people is class and attacking this rich guy and this poor person who doesn't have much money. but the guy is on the margin of poverty. would love to go to work as a landscaper in this hypothetical home that i am describing. the guy on the margin, they would love to work like that. so, there is a connection there and i don't see why washington our friends on the democrati
casualty rates in europe. and so when chet comes back to san francisco, those people who signed no no were looked upon as cowards. they were traitors. they sat out the war where these other people died. everyone a friend, an uncle or somebody they knew who had died, lost an arm, or was killed in service. chet comes back and he is literally spit on by his own community. so my protagonist is someone who is an ex-jazz musician, who spent his adult years playing with black groups, he comes back to san francisco at a time when japan town is still sort of unraveling from this sort of who lives here, who doesn't live here, and he wants to find japan town again, find his own sort of home while at the same time around him his own community is looking at him as if he is a traitor. so as he says and used to say in the play, i'm on the outside of the outside. my country thinks i'm a criminal, my own community thinks i'm a traitor. how does he sort of find home for himself in america given that kind of a set up? so that's where the stories all kind of converged and my central character, where he came f
the neighbors of syria and our allies in europe -- some of which have now been ahead of us like france, britain -- that we will focus in on this immediate, really potentially disastrous threat that assad will use chemical and biological weapons. >> you said a moment ago that iran is our most dangerous enemy. >> right. >> if so, how far should we be willing to go to prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons? >> well, you know, i just echo what everybody has said right up to president obama, that it's unacceptable for us to allow iran to become a nuclear state, that containment is not an acceptable alternative for all the reasons we know. i think that's absolutely right. it changes the whole balance of power in the middle east, it emboldens the terrorists like hamas and hezbollah that are agents of the iranian government. it probably, unless we're strong, leads some of our allies in the arab world to begin to accommodate to iran, and it's a threat to most of the rest of the world, including us. so, you know, the sanctions have been unprecedented, they're having an effect on the iranian economy
. too bad nobody told the navy. student loan debt is a tremendous. they do it in europe that could get a lot of kids out of hot water. they have the number two country hit in the country. that's on this thursday on "fox & friends" starting in 12 minutes. take effect in january. >> the number of americans on food stamps is up 39 percent since president obama took office. should cutting that program be part of the discussion about the to 47.7 million. >> it is a guaranteed thing. it's an entitlement program. that means if you meet the income qualifications the government must give you the money whether the government has any money to give you or not. if they don't they have to borrow it. >> that's right spending on food stamps which hit nearly $75 billion in fiscal year 2012 is currently nonnegotiable. it is exempt from sequestration should it quick in. it is not on the table as part of the efforts to negotiate closing the growing gap between revenue and spending. the u.s. department of agriculture which administers the program said quote the increase in precipitation during the 2008 to
to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these companies -- these countries no longer have much and common with each other. >> more with anne applebaum from "iron curtain." sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> president obama talks about friday's shooting in newtown, connecticut. >> on friday we learned more than two dozen people were killed when a gunman opened fire. most who died were young children with their whole lives ahead of them. every parent has a heart heavy with hurt. among the fallen more also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping their children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken today. we grieve for the families of those we lost. we keep in our careers the parents of those who survived. as blessed as they are to have children at home, they know their child's innocence has been torn away it far too early. as a nation we have endured far too many of these tragedies over the past few years. an elementary school, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless streetcorners. any of thes
thim in europe and saw your grand daughter for the first time in there. >> governor, you know, we were and we wanted to see her while he was still in ethiopia and it didn't work out. we were going to land there and for security reasons we couldn't do it. i never staw marie until the awas in process and we were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband. we met in germany and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately marie was going to be our grand daughter. i had no doubt about it i you hear about a match made in heaven. this was made in heaven. >> christmas time, and tell me what you are hoping happens for you this christmas? >> this christmas, i think i am really looked forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather maid. >> yes, sir he did. >> sounds like a wonderful family tradition. you i think it is interesting you didn't say you wanted for yourself but doing something as a family and honoring christ on his birth. it is obvious that the family that you have been placed into and chosen you is a very fram fam. senator, i just want to ask
across europe. he toured the world with his group, his music caught fire. he was only the second jazz musician after louis armstrong, to appear on the cover of "time" magazine. he was honored at the kennedy center, and got to watch his own sons perform music on stage. ♪ ♪ ♪ . dave brubeck, american master, was one day short of his 92nd birthday. >>> and jack brooks has died, had was a student of texas, an enemy of richard nixon, attacked government waste all his life. he was pro labor, pro guns and pro district funds. he was in the vehicle when president kennedy was killed in dallas, he was among the giants in congress, over 42 combative years in the house of representatives. jack brooks was eighty-nine years old. >>> and a prank phone call gets the attention in london and around the world this morning. two morning radio hosts had the bright idea to call the hospital treating the pregnant duchess. they asked to speak to her, and unlikely as it may seem they got through to her nurse. and you're about to hear, the call sounded like a bad monty python sketch, with them doing an act
in eastern and central europe that are struggling to not only become members of the european union, but to join the north anti-ic treaty organization because they -- atlantic treaty organization because they are still seek a chance to be free from that kind of repression. i'm reminded what took place during the 2008 olympics, summer olympics, in georgia when we saw the incursion from putin's russia into georgia over the break away regions, and we continue to see lots of threats. it is a very dangerous world. very dangerous world. tragically, plato said only the dead have seen the end of war. and i remember this, we saw the demise of the soviet union, the kremlin, berlin wall, many of us did believe, and it was famously wrote about the end of history believing that political pluralism, rule of law, and self-determination, and democratic institutions would thrive all over the world. well, it hasn't quite worked out that way in the last couple of decades. and we all know what the consequences of those threats have been for the first time ever. we had the kind of attack we did on septe
democrats and in europe. they need some time to be more able -- to be able -- they are very successful on the side of the opposition. right now in sight of the government, there is a tremendous responsibility. we have seen that from the parliamentarian elections were the muslim brothers in egypt but the majority. until the results, they lost 4 million of votes. this is why we have a responsibility in the united states to support democratic institutions not allowing any ideological block to hijack the revolution or the institutions. at the same time, not taking sides. that will have a negative impact. it is an important asset to combat the jihad tests or the extremists. -- jihadists or the extremists. the muslim brothers in tunisia .ccused this is why we have to a differentiates between the muslim brothers and the girondists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. -- jihadists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. are they committed to values. this is the most important thing. >> and we have seen in syria where they had a violent fight between the muslim brothers and the ala
, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courte
between a very rich oligarch. the problems of what you have in europe, the most successful countries like switzerland, norway, 90% is a successful middle-class. they must develop the middle class. it is impossible to build a democratic country, a tolerant country that is ready to coexist. >> you cannot move to scandinavia. that is not one of the options for israel. let me ask you this question. as opposed from lurching from conference to conference, when you think over a 10-year or 20- year horizon, given your pessimism about the palestinians, think about it further out. what is it that we in america are helping you attain? is it to continue the status quo? is it to have a negotiated peace? >> i completely agree with you that the first real and crucial mistake was from moses, that he brought us to the middle east. we are in the middle east. in the middle east, there is no coincidence that we have only one vibrant democracy. the state of israel them that despite all of our challenges. you see what happens now in syria and even in iraq, in egypt. despite all the challenges, we are still a v
while high while illegal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> a reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> reporter: marijuana advocates argue marijuana is less debilitating than alcohol. but a new study shows those who drive within 3 hours of smoking pot are at a greater risk of causing a crash. >> it inhibits the ability to jump the judge time and distance. >> reporter: in state where marijuana is legal, the level is 5 man or grams. the impairment some argue is equal to alcohol. >> it's difficult to determine whether that five nanograms will change. >> reporter: heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> two dosages would give me 5 nanograms. it's impossible to make that determination. >> reporter: the bottom line is this is going to be litigated. the pot people want it at 10 nanograms and it's at 5. megyn: coming up. how does amer
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